Is the Web changing our brains? Part 2

More recently, John Hattie and Gregory Yates (Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn) have compiled a substantial review of a variety of topics regarding learning and the scientific support for learning theories. Aimed primarily at educators, the book aptly summarises the current evidence base and educational case regarding the Web and the changing brain (amongst many other topics). Summarised, the Web may well change the brain but it is as yet unclear if that has had any effect on students’ ability to learn. What we are studying now is whether these changes will cause behavioural changes as well. As of yet, the results are mixed and with regard to education; we simply don’t know whether lack of attention in classrooms could be explained by neurological adaptations to the Web or from factors like the pervasive nature of smart-phone and subsequent easy access to Angry Birds.

More recently, John Hattie and Gregory Yates (Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn) have compiled a substantial review of a variety of topics regarding learning and the scientific support for learning theories. Aimed primarily at educators, the book aptly summarises the current evidence base and educational case regarding the Web and the changing brain (amongst many other topics). Summarised, the Web may well change the brain but it is as yet unclear if that has had any effect on students’ ability to learn. What we are studying now is whether these changes will cause behavioural changes as well. As of yet, the results are mixed and with regard to education; we simply don’t know whether lack of attention in classrooms could be explained by neurological adaptations to the Web or from factors like the pervasive nature of smart-phone and subsequent easy access to Angry Birds.

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