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My favourite shipwreck: Warwick

In this short video, Ammandeep discusses her favourite shipwreck Warwick:   Of the shipwrecks that I have dived, this will always be my favourite shipwreck as studying her opened my eyes to the fascinating world that is Maritime Archaeology! Warwick sank in 1619 in Castle Harbour, Bermuda as a hurricane swept across the islands. The ship broke free of her moorings, at King’s Anchorage, and was dashed against the surrounding reefs and cliffs. Continue reading →

SS City of Medicine Hat

In this short video, Dani explains why SS City of Medicine Hat is her favourite shipwreck. Check out her blog entry on other shipwrecks from her home province. Transcript Hello! My name is Dani. I'm a student at the University of Southampton and I'm a facilitator on the course. My favourite shipwreck is the SS City of Medicine Hat. It was found in a city called Saskatoon, which is in central Canada - that makes it about three days' drive from the nearest ocean. Continue reading →

Make your own paper Tudor artefacts

Last week we looked at the Tudor warship, the Mary Rose (Step 2.14 of the Mooc).  For a bit of fun this weekend, why not try and make your own artefacts? Our friends at the Mary Rose Museum have a wonderful collection of paper craft Tudor era artefacts that you can make at home.  All you need is a printer, scissors, glue and a bit of patience! The flagon took about 10 minutes and Henry VIII was at least 30 minutes to make. Continue reading →

Using software to simulate port structures

Thomas Dhoop discusses how software can be used to simulate port structures. He explains how we can map the transport of goods from boats through history.   The fortunes of Southampton correlate with its maritime history. Its geographical location - on a major estuary on the English Channel coast with an unusual double high-tide, and its proximity to Winchester and London; the ancient and modern capitals of England - made the city an important regional centre for many centuries. Continue reading →

Preserving maritime traditions

In this short video, Crystal discusses the importance of preserving maritime traditions. Do you agree with Crystal? Further information on the preservation of maritime traditions If you are interested in maritime traditions, you might want to visit Traditional Maritime Skills. This is the website of the Traditional Maritime Skills project. The aim of this EU project is to record wooden boatbuilding skills. These skills are in danger of disappearing as masters of the trade retire. Continue reading →

The Warship Vasa – Part 2

Vasa is an example of a wreck that was raised first and excavated after. A team led by Per Lundström consisting of ten archaeologists, a photographer and an artist, were charged with the task. Working conditions were exceptionally harsh. The ship had to be sprayed constantly with cold, fresh water to keep it from drying out, meaning that the team had to work in an invariably wet environment. Garden hoses and spray nozzles were used to wash away the black mud covering Vasa’s decks. Continue reading →