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underwater archaeology

The Loss of the Gribshunden (1495) and Preliminary Archaeological Investigations

Guest post on Gribshunden by Rolf Fabricius Warming Gribshunden, also known as Gripshunden, and Griffone, was a large Danish warship employed in the fleet of King John I (Danish: Kong Hans) who reigned in Denmark from 1481 to 1513. Gribshunden appears in some of the earliest Danish fleet records and is amongst the first Danish vessels to be described as a carvel. Continue reading →

Funded PhD: Mapping potential wreck sites with seafloor data – scientific, social and legal considerations

We are very happy to announce a  fully funded PhD studentship for UK/EU students as part of the Marine and Maritime Futures Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholarship scheme at the University of Southampton.   If you have an excellent academic track record, are looking for a stimulating and challenging transdisciplinary project in a world class research environment please read on for further details on how to apply ... Continue reading →

Answering your questions on Week 1

https://youtu.be/hBTHuoSGJqs This week several members of the course team met to answer some of the key questions that have come out of the course this week. Some of the questions that educators tackle include: 1.9. Salim Al Hajri: How do these names vary through time and space? I mean from place to place (Europe to Middle East to China) and from the Romans to nowadays? Michael Smith: Maritime archaeology is the study of man-made objects, cultures, etc., in and around the sea. Continue reading →

HMS Invincible dive

Thanks to Rodrigo, one of our new facilitators, for sharing this short video from last weekend's dive on Royal Navy's first HMS Invincible. The ship sank on Horse Tail Sand in the Eastern Solent in 1758. The bow of the site has been scoured out, revealing the gun deck and various artefacts. For more information about the site, please visit: http://www.maritimearchaeologytrust. Continue reading →

Life of a core sample

Core samples can be gathered from all over the world. Here, core samples are being taken from an intertidal site at Somerset. They can be removed from the ground using a variety of techniques; either hand powered or mechanical in nature. We can take them from dry land, inter-tidal and underwater contexts. Once removed from the site they are taken to the BOSCORF (British Ocean Sediment Core Research Facility) Core store at the National Oceanographic Centre in Southampton. Continue reading →

A place for submerged aircraft in maritime archaeology?

In this post, maritime archaeologist Tony Burgess examines the growing sub-field of aviation archaeology. When one thinks of maritime archaeology, the first images conjured up are those of shipwrecks, and maybe harbours and submerged landscapes, but (perhaps for fairly obvious reasons) rarely of submerged aircraft, and yet aircraft and all things maritime do share common ground, both literally and theoretically. Continue reading →