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Archaeology

Meet the team at Buckler’s Hard shipwrightery weekend

This weekend, Professor Jon Adams, Dr Julian Whitewright and Rodrigo Ortiz will be at Buckler's Hard in the New Forest as part of the shipwrightery weekend. One of the objectives of this workshop is for our students to learn how to use the tools of the trade to produce the tools marks they will need to interpret as maritime archaeologists. To read more about what the students will be doing, please visit the News section of the Buckler's Hard website (May Bank Holiday Weekend at Buckler's Hard). Continue reading →

Using software to simulate port structures

Thomas Dhoop discusses how software can be used to simulate port structures. He explains how we can map the transport of goods from boats through history.   The fortunes of Southampton correlate with its maritime history. Its geographical location - on a major estuary on the English Channel coast with an unusual double high-tide, and its proximity to Winchester and London; the ancient and modern capitals of England - made the city an important regional centre for many centuries. Continue reading →

The Loss of the Gribshunden (1495) and Preliminary Archaeological Investigations

Guest post on Gribshunden by Rolf Fabricius Warming Gribshunden, also known as Gripshunden, and Griffone, was a large Danish warship employed in the fleet of King John I (Danish: Kong Hans) who reigned in Denmark from 1481 to 1513. Gribshunden appears in some of the earliest Danish fleet records and is amongst the first Danish vessels to be described as a carvel. Continue reading →

Mud, glorious mud (and maybe some sand)

Understandably, there is often a focus on maritime archaeological sites that lie underwater and many of the most impressive or important ones, like the Mary Rose, or the Vasa are discussed during the shipwrecks course. We are also familiar with sites on land that have their origins in maritime worlds, ship burials like Sutton Hoo, or silted up harbour sites such as Myos Hormos in Egypt. Continue reading →

An interdisciplinary database about Roman ports

You are welcome to attend a FREE research seminar at University of Southampton. Venue: Lecture Theatre A (Room 1133), Building 65, Avenue Campus, University of Southampton Date: Wednesday February 10th Time: 18:00 Professor Simon Keay, Dr Nicolas Carayon and Hembo Pagi (Rome’s Mediterranean Ports project, University of Southampton) will be discussing 'An interdisciplinary database about Roman ports'. Continue reading →