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Blue Planet 2: Green Seas (and Blue Carbon)

The capacity of coastal habitats to capture and store carbon is a huge research interest of mine, so when David Attenborough talked about it on Blue Planet 2 earlier this evening I couldn't have been more pleased! Tonight's episode was called 'Green Seas', and covered habitats and ecosystems often passed over by documentary makers in favour of more 'charismatic' ocean dwellers: seagrass meadows, kelp beds, mangrove forests and algal blooms. Continue reading →

What to expect from Blue Planet 2 – Green Seas

When we think of the ocean we largely picture a vast, blue wilderness, as witnessed in last week’s episode of Blue Planet 2 – Big Blue. This week we’ve been promised a glimpse inside the ocean’s 'Green Seas' – the most productive, and arguably most important expanses of the marine environment. During my time studying at the University of Southampton, I’ve learned a great deal about our ‘green seas’. Continue reading →

Blue Planet | Episode 4 | Big Blue

The open ocean may seem like a vast, featureless wasteland to us outsiders, but its inhabits are intrepid navigators that use its structures to embark on some of the most epic journeys known to science. Leatherback turtles have been shown to migrate across the entire Pacific Ocean. Two hatchling leatherbacks were once tracked moving 39km in 34 hours and 82km in 39 hours, an extraordinary distance for a baby weighing less than 40g in one of the first days of its life. Continue reading →

Guest Post: Libby Robinson – Climates of the past…what can they tell us about our future?

Have you ever thought about the implications of ocean anoxia in the past? Here to tell you more about the role anoxia has played in shaping the history of Earth is Libby Robinson..... Hi, I’m Libby, a first year PhD student at NOC studying climates of the past, otherwise known as paleoclimates (paleo just meaning “very, very old” – and in this case, having nothing to do with the unprocessed, whole-food diet). Continue reading →

No excuse for Single Use

Anyone that watched the 4th episode of Blue Planet 2, the Big Blue, was most definitely affected by the scene with the mother carrying her deceased calf. The cause of death was assumed to be due to plastic contaminating the milk and thus poisoning the baby whale. It was a heart-breaking scene that brought our excessive use of plastic to the spotlight for millions to see. Continue reading →

What to expect from Blue Planet 2 – Big Blue

My name is Elin and I’m a fourth-year MSci Marine Biology student at the University of Southampton. Like Kieran, I’ve been following the Blue Planet 2 series with great enthusiasm, and I’ve really enjoyed seeing the theory we’ve learned in lectures come to life in wonderful HD. With this in mind, I’ll be sharing my thoughts on the natural spectacles we might expect to see in the upcoming Blue Planet 2 episodes, starting with Big Blue. Continue reading →

A brief introduction to microplastics

The word microplastic has slowly but steadily crept up in scientific literature over the past couple of years. These small and near invisible pieces of plastic have created quite a name for themselves, along with a lot of confusion around what they are and how they may be damaging the environment. Public awareness to help reduce plastic use is an excellent way forward but not all of the information feeding this movement is based on sound evidence. Continue reading →

Guest Post – Tabitha Pearman: How the online MOOC ‘Exploring Our Oceans’ led me to do a PhD at NOCS

Understanding our oceans is the key to ensuring we learn to protect them. Through education and increased awareness the hope is we can inspire more people to want to study our oceans. Tabitha is a second year PhD student based in the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton,  modelling deep-sea canyon habitats, and she is here to tell you how she ended up doing a PhD….. Continue reading →