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Foraminifera: The tiny and mighty

This post is reproduced from a 2014 cruise blog: http://slidesinthedeep.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/big-things-in-small-shells.html   Contrary to popular belief, euphemisms, idioms and trite sayings often have little relevance to real life. Foraminifera on the other hand, lend credibility to the notion that big things do indeed come in small packages. Foraminifera are small, single-celled marine plankton; more specifically known as Protists. Continue reading →

Guest post from Gwen Owen Jones – Biomarkers: what can they tell us about the past?

Throughout this course, you are learning lots about how the ocean behaves today but have you ever thought about how it behaved in the past? Both Matthew and myself are Palaeoceanographers and this is precisely what we study: how the oceans and climate have varied throughout time. Hopefully over the remainder of the course you will hear a bit more about this subject from me, Matthew and some other members of our research group. Continue reading →

How did you get a job like that?

I often get asked about my career path and I thought I would share my journey with you. The truth is my career has been one happy accident after another. I'm currently gainfully employed as a Research Technician in Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton. I have been within the department for 8 years now doing a variety of roles. It all began way back in 2004 when I took up a place to Study a BSc in Marine Biology at the University of Aberdeen. Continue reading →

A guest post from Prof. Maarten De Wit, Nelson Mandela University

Last year Marten De Wit was hosted at Southampton and took part in the MOOC. Maarten is an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society and a Professor at Nelson Mandela University. He wrote a short post about his time here for the blog: As I travelled back from Southampton to my own university flanking the Indian Ocean (Nelson Mandela University) I came to appreciate and respect much better the global value of the NOC and the Ocean and Earth Centre of the University of Southampton. Continue reading →

What do the oceans mean to me?

It has been asked in the first week to describe the oceans from your own point of view. Here below is what they mean to me. For me, oceans are MYSTERY. Light disappears rapidly in depth, after 1000 meters, it is the absolute darkness, deep and unknown. I chose this picture of a ROV (remotely operated vehicle) surrounded by this obscurity. Thanks to it, light is brought in the most obscure parts of our planet, and discoveries are infinite.  (Image credit to NOAA ) For me, oceans are LIFE. Continue reading →

What does the ocean mean to me?

Immediately my mind jumps straight to Cula Bay, Benbecula. My beach, well I say mine, it’s for everyone but its where I spent my whole childhood and this summer I’ll be taking my own baby boy there for the very first time and I can’t wait. If I close my eyes I can feel the sand under my toes and the sun on my face, the dark stormy days of winter and the sound of the crashing waves as the Atlantic Ocean comes battering down on the shore. Continue reading →

Hello!

Hello! My name is Matt, I’m a first-year PhD student here at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton and am looking forward to being one of the facilitators for the ‘Exploring our Oceans’ MOOC. During my time in Southampton I’m studying the climate of North Africa and how it has varied over the last few million years. Continue reading →

What The Oceans Mean To Me

As a climate scientist, it would be an obvious choice to write about how the oceans for me are an integral player in the climate system and a vessel for recording past climate change. Instead, I thought I’d share some of my favourite pictures of the oceans and what they mean to me. One of the most well-known ocean features is how they cover about 71% of our planet, a fact that, when put in perspective and you realise how vast they actually are, is always truly staggering. Continue reading →