Currently browsing category

Uncategorized

Blue Planet 2: Green Seas (and Blue Carbon)

The capacity of coastal habitats to capture and store carbon is a huge research interest of mine, so when David Attenborough talked about it on Blue Planet 2 earlier this evening I couldn't have been more pleased! Tonight's episode was called 'Green Seas', and covered habitats and ecosystems often passed over by documentary makers in favour of more 'charismatic' ocean dwellers: seagrass meadows, kelp beds, mangrove forests and algal blooms. Continue reading →

Guest Post: Libby Robinson – Climates of the past…what can they tell us about our future?

Have you ever thought about the implications of ocean anoxia in the past? Here to tell you more about the role anoxia has played in shaping the history of Earth is Libby Robinson..... Hi, I’m Libby, a first year PhD student at NOC studying climates of the past, otherwise known as paleoclimates (paleo just meaning “very, very old” – and in this case, having nothing to do with the unprocessed, whole-food diet). Continue reading →

Hurricanes & Coral Reefs

Hello! My name is Adeline and I’m a third-year PhD Student (already!) at the NOC. I have been a MOOC facilitator for over a year now, and I’m learning lots of weird and wonderful things thanks to all your very thoughtful questions. If you're curious about what I am doing (four words: Hydrothermal vents and mineral resources). Continue reading →

Preparing for life at sea

How many sample bags do you need for a six-week research cruise? How much ‘blue roll’ (like lab kitchen roll I guess) should we pack? How many permanent markers is too many? Answers: far too many to count and in every size imaginable; 48 rolls to be precise but we might pick up a few more on the way just to be safe; and apologises, we may be responsible for a temporary permanent marker shortage in Southampton. Continue reading →

Mesocosms; environmental laboratories

Studying the biology of the marine environment can prove tricky, there are many factors you must consider when looking at it. The influence of water chemistry, physics, weather can all impact the biology. We can work in the laboratory, and control a number of these. We can determine how much light or nutrients organisms get, which allows us to test specific variables. But there is an “in between” of the lab and the environment, and this is what is known as a mesocosm. Continue reading →