Currently browsing category

Ocean Exploration

Tracing Metals

Tracing metals I love the ocean, studying it, and before joining the University of Southampton as a Research fellow, I had put much thought into the particular role of shelf seas in the global marine system. In previous years I have put my focus on the deep ocean. I have been analysing trace metals in seawater to look at the big picture – how water masses with billions of liters per second are distributed along the ocean conveyor belt. Continue reading →

The Treacle Ocean

When you think of ocean oceanography you probably think of people diving with corals or boats deploying brightly coloured equipment. I myself am a physical oceanographer and personally don’t get my feet wet very often. So what do I do? Well, I model the ocean using a computer… a big one!   The ocean is very complex and understanding the whole ocean to predict how it will respond to changing climate is very difficult. Continue reading →

Welcome to “Exploring our Oceans”.

  Welcome to "Exploring our Oceans"! Although we still have a few days before we get started on the course, this is a brief welcome to the MOOC, and a taste of some of the topics we have coming up over the next six weeks. This blog site will be home to your mentors and educators for the course, all of us PhD students and academics at NOC who will be guiding you through the material and sharing a little bit about our daily lives here at the National Oceanography Centre. Continue reading →

Human footprint along marine ecosystems  

  Evidences accumulated over the last few decades reveal a growing human impact on marine ecosystems, but effects on biological communities are still largely unknown. Human activities such as fisheries, urban development, tourism, and maritime traffic, greatly influence distribution and quantity of marine litter from shores to deeper regions of continental margins, where may enter directly through a wide variety of maritime activities including disposal (e.g. Continue reading →

Life on the high seas – Equatorial Pacific

I imagine most people would say if they had the chance to work at sea on a state-of-the-art research ships that it was a great opportunity… to miss the Great British winter! Clear blue skies and temperatures never below 27°C in January, it was bliss. We sailed from Balboa adjacent to Panama City on 28th December southwest into the Pacific and then headed north for the seas off Guatemala. Continue reading →

Mapping the deep, and the real story behind the “95% unexplored” oceans

At the end of this month, we will be running an update of our free Massive Open Online Course ("MOOC") about "Exploring Our Oceans", intended for anyone interested in finding out more about our watery world, with no previous background in science required. One topic we'll look at in Week 1 of the course, "A hidden landscape", is how we map the ocean floor, and how much has been mapped at different levels of detail. Continue reading →

Onwards and downwards: when ROVs or AUVs are lost in ocean exploration

This week saw the news that the Nereus hybrid remotely operated vehicle (HROV) has been lost while exploring the Kermadec Trench at a depth of 9.99 km, during an expedition that has revealed that part of our planet as never before. To link with Week 5 of our free Massive Open Online Course on "Exploring Our Oceans", during which we focus on how we explore the oceans, this post takes a look at some of the ROVs and AUVs that have been lost during ocean exploration. Continue reading →