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Impacts

A brief introduction to microplastics

The word microplastic has slowly but steadily crept up in scientific literature over the past couple of years. These small and near invisible pieces of plastic have created quite a name for themselves, along with a lot of confusion around what they are and how they may be damaging the environment. Public awareness to help reduce plastic use is an excellent way forward but not all of the information feeding this movement is based on sound evidence. Continue reading →

Grand Canyons

Terrestrial canyons like the Grand Canyon, USA are spectacular geomorphic features carved out over millions of years by river erosion. They can extend for many hundreds of kilometres, have a width of up to 29 Km, and be as deep as 6 Km. However, the submerged margins of continental landmasses are also host to huge canyons systems; the scale of which can rival canyons on land. These submarine canyons extend from the shallow shelf down the deep oceans, and are host to a wide diversity of life. Continue reading →

A guest post from Prof. Maarten De Wit, Nelson Mandela University

Last year Marten De Wit was hosted at Southampton and took part in the MOOC. Maarten is an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society and a Professor at Nelson Mandela University. He wrote a short post about his time here for the blog: As I travelled back from Southampton to my own university flanking the Indian Ocean (Nelson Mandela University) I came to appreciate and respect much better the global value of the NOC and the Ocean and Earth Centre of the University of Southampton. Continue reading →

Millie Watts: My research

My research project is a fascinating topic, and I am very lucky to be part of the team that I work in here. I work as part of the Sedimentology and Marine Geohazards research group, specifically on the Arctic Landslide Tsunami Project which is seeking to address the risks posed to the UK by tsunamis. Continue reading →

Human footprint along marine ecosystems  

  Evidences accumulated over the last few decades reveal a growing human impact on marine ecosystems, but effects on biological communities are still largely unknown. Human activities such as fisheries, urban development, tourism, and maritime traffic, greatly influence distribution and quantity of marine litter from shores to deeper regions of continental margins, where may enter directly through a wide variety of maritime activities including disposal (e.g. Continue reading →

My Research: Cristian Florindo-Lopez

Hello everyone, My name is Cristian Florindo-Lopez and this autumn I will be part of the "Exploring our Oceans" MOOC’s mentors team. On a regular day, I am a PhD student on my third year at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton. In today’s post I would like to share with you what my research is about. Briefly, I could say it is framed in the dynamics of Polar Regions, specifically the Arctic Ocean. Continue reading →

My Research: Flic Williams

Hello Hello! I’m Felicity Williams and I study how sea level changes when the amount of ice on land either grows or melts. It is very tempting to think of our earth as one large bath tub in which the water level goes up and down uniformly across the entire surface. The real world is far more interesting! Every location around the world experiences a different sea level for the same amount of water being added to or taken away from the oceans. Continue reading →