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Future

A guest post from Prof. Maarten De Wit, Nelson Mandela University

Last year Marten De Wit was hosted at Southampton and took part in the MOOC. Maarten is an Honorary Fellow of the Geological Society and a Professor at Nelson Mandela University. He wrote a short post about his time here for the blog: As I travelled back from Southampton to my own university flanking the Indian Ocean (Nelson Mandela University) I came to appreciate and respect much better the global value of the NOC and the Ocean and Earth Centre of the University of Southampton. Continue reading →

Millie Watts: My research

My research project is a fascinating topic, and I am very lucky to be part of the team that I work in here. I work as part of the Sedimentology and Marine Geohazards research group, specifically on the Arctic Landslide Tsunami Project which is seeking to address the risks posed to the UK by tsunamis. Continue reading →

My Research: Flic Williams

Hello Hello! I’m Felicity Williams and I study how sea level changes when the amount of ice on land either grows or melts. It is very tempting to think of our earth as one large bath tub in which the water level goes up and down uniformly across the entire surface. The real world is far more interesting! Every location around the world experiences a different sea level for the same amount of water being added to or taken away from the oceans. Continue reading →

My Research: Josie Robinson

Hi everyone, My name is Josie Robinson and I’m excited to be a facilitator on the “Exploring our Oceans” MOOC. I’m just entering the 3rd year of my PhD at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, where I’ve been looking at ocean iron fertilisation. By iron fertilisation I mean the addition of iron, which is a vital ingredient for life along with other essential nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Continue reading →

Onwards and downwards: when ROVs or AUVs are lost in ocean exploration

This week saw the news that the Nereus hybrid remotely operated vehicle (HROV) has been lost while exploring the Kermadec Trench at a depth of 9.99 km, during an expedition that has revealed that part of our planet as never before. To link with Week 5 of our free Massive Open Online Course on "Exploring Our Oceans", during which we focus on how we explore the oceans, this post takes a look at some of the ROVs and AUVs that have been lost during ocean exploration. Continue reading →