Currently browsing category

biology

Understanding cold-water corals

This post is a contribution from our guest Dr Katleen Robert, at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University, St John’s, NL, Canada. From May 15th to June 8th, I was lucky enough to participate in my 10th expedition at sea.  As part of the TOSCA Expedition composed of an international team of scientists, I boarded the RV Celtic Explorer in Galway, Ireland, and we left for the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone, approximately 1,500 km away in the middle of the Norther Atlantic. Continue reading →

ROV dives for dummies!

With the collaboration of the ROV Holland 1, the scientific expedition TOSCA, the Research Vessel Celtic Explorer, from the Irish Marine Institute (http://scientistsatsea.blogspot.com/) , and some notes from Dr. Katleen Robert (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada).  Everything you always wanted to know – from A to Z about how to succeed a ROV (remotely operated vehicle) dive. Continue reading →

Week one of an Atlantic crossing aboard the RRS James Cook

It’s been about a week since the RRS James Cook departed from Rio De Janeiro on its expedition across the South Atlantic Ocean. As we waved goodbye to sugarloaf, I had not yet fully realised that next time I set foot on land would in Cape Town in 6 weeks’ time. This will be my longest expedition yet and if each week is as exciting as this first, then its setting out to be an incredible journey. Continue reading →

Blue Planet 2 | Episode 6 | Coasts

We have a tendency to take our coastlines for granted. It is by far the most accessible and relatable marine habitat, with thousands flocking there every day for their primary source of food, watersports, or just to relax. The UN estimates 40% of the world's population live in coastal areas. They provide the most extensive economic and social benefits of any natural habitat, encompassing 77% of the services provided to us by all ecosystems. Continue reading →

Blue Planet | Episode 4 | Big Blue

The open ocean may seem like a vast, featureless wasteland to us outsiders, but its inhabits are intrepid navigators that use its structures to embark on some of the most epic journeys known to science. Leatherback turtles have been shown to migrate across the entire Pacific Ocean. Two hatchling leatherbacks were once tracked moving 39km in 34 hours and 82km in 39 hours, an extraordinary distance for a baby weighing less than 40g in one of the first days of its life. Continue reading →

In a Sea of Stars

                  Today's guest blog post is from my good friend and office mate Christina Wood. Christina will tell you all about herself and the work she does, take it away Christina... I am a PhD student studying at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. In March 2017, I participated in a cruise to the Barents Sea to assist researchers as part of the ongoing MAREANO project. Continue reading →