I am a Palaeoceanographer

As a palaeoceanographer most of the samples I work on have been collected during ocean drilling expeditions by the International Ocean Discovery Program (or DSDP/ODP, IODP’s predecessors). This vital program brings together scientists from all around the world to work together to tackle the big remaining unanswered science questions about our oceans and Earth’s history. Continue reading →

In a Sea of Stars

                  Today's guest blog post is from my good friend and office mate Christina Wood. Christina will tell you all about herself and the work she does, take it away Christina... I am a PhD student studying at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. In March 2017, I participated in a cruise to the Barents Sea to assist researchers as part of the ongoing MAREANO project. Continue reading →

Tiny grazers love to eat their greens

This blog is from a mesocosm experiment (giant (5m by 8m deep) 'bags' placed into environments and filled with natural water) conducted during May 2017 (find more info here). It was written by myself & Sean Anderson (a graduate student at the Skidaway Institute, University of Georgia, USA). Members of the Harvey Lab get really excited about phytoplankton and for good reason. Continue reading →

Deep-sea corals

When we think of corals, for most people this brings up colorful views of clear blue waters and colorful tropical reefs around which swim a multitude of exotic fish.  However, these are not the only coral reefs present in our ocean, there are highly productive and extensive reefs in the colder and deeper waters of our oceans. Continue reading →

Grand Canyons

Terrestrial canyons like the Grand Canyon, USA are spectacular geomorphic features carved out over millions of years by river erosion. They can extend for many hundreds of kilometres, have a width of up to 29 Km, and be as deep as 6 Km. However, the submerged margins of continental landmasses are also host to huge canyons systems; the scale of which can rival canyons on land. These submarine canyons extend from the shallow shelf down the deep oceans, and are host to a wide diversity of life. Continue reading →

Cruising – What scientists get up to out at sea

Back in November and December 2016 I went out on a cruise on the National Oceanography Centre's very own RRS Discovery! We spent three weeks off the North-West African coast, just south of the Canary Islands. The main objective of the cruise was to test the piston coring system and train the crew in how to use the equipment to get ready for a full research cruise early in 2018 in the South Atlantic. Continue reading →