Understanding cold-water corals

This post is a contribution from our guest Dr Katleen Robert, at the Fisheries and Marine Institute of Memorial University, St John’s, NL, Canada. From May 15th to June 8th, I was lucky enough to participate in my 10th expedition at sea.  As part of the TOSCA Expedition composed of an international team of scientists, I boarded the RV Celtic Explorer in Galway, Ireland, and we left for the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone, approximately 1,500 km away in the middle of the Norther Atlantic. Continue reading →

ROV dives for dummies!

With the collaboration of the ROV Holland 1, the scientific expedition TOSCA, the Research Vessel Celtic Explorer, from the Irish Marine Institute (http://scientistsatsea.blogspot.com/) , and some notes from Dr. Katleen Robert (Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada).  Everything you always wanted to know – from A to Z about how to succeed a ROV (remotely operated vehicle) dive. Continue reading →

Guest Blog – Amanda Cheong (Singapore)

Hi everyone, I am Amanda and I would like to share a blog about my five-week internship at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS). It is my great pleasure to be given the opportunity to work with Prof. Richard Sanders (@OceanRics), Dr. Daniel Mayor and Ms. Stacey Felgate (@staceyfelgate). As a student at the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore, I worked on quantifying dissolved organic matter and how the composition changes along a land-to-ocean continuum. Continue reading →

How far are we from the deep ocean?

Human beings have held two dreams for long: to jump out of the world and to dive into the deep. Decades of exploration has gradually turned the brilliant dreams into reality. In the year 1960, the deepest part of the ocean - Mariana Trench (deeper than 10000 meters), was visited by two oceanographers. This marked the milestone demonstrating our capability to reach wherever we would like to reach in the ocean. Continue reading →

Redistributing marine biodiversity – guest post from Jamie Hudson

I’m Jamie Hudson, a Marine Biology PhD student at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. My research looks at the role different factors have in redistributing marine biodiversity around our coasts, notably climate change and hybridisation. The ranges occupied by species are by no mean static- species are moving areas due to multiple reasons. There is a plethora of data that show our oceans are warming. Continue reading →

A brief history of ocean drilling (1/3)

Did you know the oceans are great story tellers?! Curators of Earth’s history. And by taking a peak below the seafloor we can reconstruct the history of submarine landslides, and volcanic eruptions, the pattern and rate of seafloor spreading, the climate enjoyed by the dinosaurs and the vegetation present when the humans took their very first steps on planet Earth. This week in the MOOC is all about looking forward; how we can work together to protect our oceans. Continue reading →

Adventures of Clair Patterson

You may have been aware that our Earth is as old as 4.5 billion years. But do you know who found out this fantastic figure first? The destiny rests on shoulders on a young man, Clair Patterson, who was a PhD student at the University of Chicago in the 1940s. I'd like to share his story with you! The first task for Patterson was to measure the concentration and isotope composition of lead inside the zircon, which is extremely useful for geological dating. Continue reading →

This is what we call a deep-sea exploration!

Just last weekend, I went to visit my 4 years-old goddaughter back in Belgium and I was telling the secrets of the oceans, their amazing creatures and how I became a deep-ocean explorer.  While I was speaking, I could see the same excitation and admiration in her eyes that I feel every time I get to go at sea. This year again, I have the wonderful opportunity to join an upcoming cruise on board the Celtic Explorer (CE18008). Continue reading →

Mapping the Seafloor

Hi everyone, it is Adeline writing today! I've been active in Exploring our Oceans MOOC since November 2014 (when I did the course while I was applying for a PhD here at Southampton!). Today, I would like to give you an update on seafloor mapping. In his video, from the first week, Dr Tim Le Bas discussed the proportion of the ocean that has been mapped. Continue reading →

Spring in Sweden

Of all the things I love about my job, the opportunity to travel is fairly high up the list! Whether it’s living aboard a ship in the Iceland Basin or crawling around in saltmarshes on Cape Cod, every trip teaches me something new and opens my eyes to a breadth of knowledge and experience I never before realised existed.  I thought it might be nice to share a trip I took recently to a workshop - one of the lesser known activities scientists take part in. Continue reading →